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Spring 2022 JWST Course List

 

JWST 100/RELI 123: Introduction to Jewish Studies. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the broad scope of Jewish history, culture, and identity, from biblical times to the 21st century and from the Middle East to the New World. Andrea Cooper, Tuesday and Thursday (and recitation), 2.25-3.15 pm. Gen Ed: HS, GL.

 

JWST/RELI 103: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Literature. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the various books of the Hebrew Bible and to the history and culture of ancient Israel, focusing on the formation of national identity, ancient conceptualizations of divinity, ritual practice, and modes of social regulation, all of which are set against the background of the ancient Near East. Emily Branton, Monday and Wednesday, 3.30-4.45 pm. Gen Ed: BN, WB.

 

JWST/RELI 108: Classic Jewish Texts: From Bible and Dead Sea Scrolls to Kabbalah and Hassidism. 3 Credits.

This course will explore Jewish literary works that are considered “fundamental,” “classic,” “traditional” (often, all of the above), including the Hebrew Bible, the Mishnah, the Babylonian Talmud, midrashic collections, works by Maimonides, major codes of Jewish law, major kabbalistic, philosophic, poetic, and ethical works, hassidic compositions, and more. Evyatar Marienberg, Tuesday and Thursday, 11-12.15 pm. Gen Ed: HS, WB.

 

JWST/ASIA/PWAD 235: Israeli Cinema: Gender, Nation, and Ethnicity. 3 Credits.

The course explores major periods and trends in Israeli cinema. Focus is given to issues pertaining to gender, ethnicity, and the construction of national identity. Honors version available. TBA. Gen Ed: VP, BN, GL.

 

JWST/HIST/PWAD 262: History of the Holocaust: The Destruction of the European Jews. 3 Credits.

Anti-Semitism; the Jews of Europe; the Hitler dictatorship; evolution of Nazi Jewish policy from persecution to the Final Solution; Jewish response; collaborators, bystanders, and rescuers; aftermath. Karen Auerbach, Tuesday and Thursday (and recitation), 12.30-1.45 pm. Gen Ed: HS, NA.

 

JWST/GSLL 268: Cultural Trends in Post-Communist Central Europe: Search for Identity, Importance of Jewish Voices. 3 Credits.

We will study how contemporary literary and cinematic works of Central European intellectuals serve as reflections on the everyday life of this region. Readings and class discussions in English. Films with English subtitles. Hana Pichova, Tuesday and Thursday, 11-12.15pm. Gen Ed: LA, BN.

 

JWST/ASIA 358: Religion and Tradition in Israeli Cinema, TV, and Literature. 3 Credits.

This research-intensive course focuses on the ways religion and religious practices are represented in Israeli literature and media. The greater part of the semester will explore the variety of religious traditions in Israel within the framework of Zionist thought, gender and sexuality issues, and ethnic differences.

Yaron Shemer, Tuesday and Thursday, 2-3.15 pm. Gen Ed: LA, BN, CI.

 

JWST/FOLK 380: Traditions in Transition: Jewish Folklore and Ethnography. 3 Credits.

This seminar examines Jewish stories, humor, ritual, custom, belief, architecture, dress, and food as forms of creative expression that have complex relationships to Jewish experience, representation, identity, memory, and tradition. What makes these forms of  folklore Jewish, how do source communities interpret them, and how do ethnographers document them? Gabrielle Berlinger, Tuesday and Thursday, 12.30-1.45 pm. Gen Ed: VP, EE- Field Work, US.

 

JWST 390: Special Topics in Jewish Studies: Confronting Antisemitism . 1 Credit.

This course takes a broad look at antisemitism in history, our contemporary world, and at UNC. Class sessions will feature guest speakers and discussions on different aspects of this persistent form of hatred. The following questions are key to this course: How has antisemitism evolved over time? How has it remained the same? What are the intersections between antisemitism and other forms of racism? What tools can be used to fight antisemitism? Irene Newman, Monday, 4.40-5.30 pm. 

 

JWST/RELI 420H: Post-Holocaust Ethics and Theology. 3 Credits.

This course examines the challenges posed to ethics and theology by the Holocaust.  We will address philosophical and moral issues such as the problem of evil, divine omniscience, omnipotence, suffering, theodicy, representation, testimony, and an  ethics of memory. Honors version available. Andrea Cooper, Tuesday and Thursday, 12.30-1.45 pm. Gen Ed: PH, GL.

 

JWST/ASIA/PWAD 425: Beyond Hostilities: Israeli-Palestinian Exchanges and Partnerships in Film, Literature, and Music. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the various collaborations, exchanges, and mutual enrichment between Israelis and Palestinians in the realm of culture, particularly literature and cinema. These connections include language (Israeli Jewish authors writing in Arabic and Palestinian writers who choose Hebrew as their language of expression), collaborating in  filmmaking, and joint educational initiatives. Yaron Shemer, Tuesday and Thursday, 12.30-1.45 pm. Gen Ed: BN, GL.

 

JWST/WGST 450: Sexuality in Jewish Tradition and History. 3 Credits.

This course deals with various topics related to sexuality and marriage in Jewish tradition and history: sex outside of marriage, wedding ceremonies, regulations of marital sex, menstruation, homosexuality, and more. Evyatar Marienberg, Tuesday and Thursday, 12.30-1.45 pm. Gen Ed: PH, WB.

 

JWST/PWAD/GSLL 465: Literature of Atrocity: The Gulag and the Holocaust in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. 3 Credits.

Historical contexts and connections through artistic representation of the Holocaust and Soviet terror in Eastern Europe and the USSR. Taught in English; some foreign language readings for qualified students. David Pike, Tuesday and Thursday, 3.30-4.45 pm. Gen Ed: LA, BN, GL.

 

Language Courses

RELI 212/JWST 212: Classical Hebrew II: A Linguistic Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. 3 Credits.

This course explores the linguistic background of the Hebrew Bible, giving special attention to the literary aspect of biblical interpretation. Specific topics include the forms of the Hebrew verb, prose and poetic genres in the Hebrew Bible, wordplay and repetition, narration and dialogue. Joseph Lam, Tuesday and Thursday, 9.30-10.45 am. Gen Ed: LA, BN.

 

HEBR 102-001: Elementary Modern Hebrew II, Sprintzik, MWF 9:05-9:55

HEBR 204-001: Intermediate Modern Hebrew II, Sprintzik, MWF 10:10-11

HEBR 305: Advanced Composition and Conversation: Immigration, Ethnicities, and Religious Traditions, Sprintzik, MWF 12:20-1:10

 


Fall 2021 JWST Course List

GSLL 51: First-Year Seminar: Stalin and Hitler: Historical Issues in Cultural and Other. Perspectives. Critical issues that dominated the 20th century: WWI and Bolshevik Revolution; rise of fascism, Lenin, Stalin, Hitler and their roles; origins and evolution of Cold War; collapse of Eastern Bloc. Previously offered as GERM 51.
David Pike, Tuesday and Thursday, 3.30-4.45 pm

 

RELI 63: First-Year Seminar: The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls.
In this seminar students learn about the Dead Sea Scrolls, ancient manuscripts dating to the time of Jesus from caves around the site of Qumran by the Dead Sea. They include early copies of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and sectarian works of the Jewish community that lived in Qumran.
Jodi Magness, TBD

 

RELI/JWST 103: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Literature.
This course introduces students to the various books of the Hebrew Bible and to the history and culture of ancient Israel, focusing on the formation of national identity, ancient conceptualizations of divinity, ritual practice, and modes of social regulation, all of which are set against the background of the ancient Near East. Honors version available.
David Lambert, Monday and Wednesday, 1.25-2.15 pm (with recitation on Thursday or Friday)

 

 RELI/JWST 106: Introduction to Early Judaism.
This course surveys Jewish history and religion during the Second Temple and Rabbinic periods, from the destruction of the First Jewish Temple (Solomon’s Temple) in 586 BCE to the Muslim conquest of Palestine (640 CE).
TBD

 

HIST/JWST 153: From the Bible to Broadway: Jewish History to Modern Times.

This class surveys the history of the Jews from ancient to modern times. It focuses on the development of Jewish religion, culture identity, and politics in Jewish communities in the Western, Atlantic and Middle Eastern Worlds. It also explores the development of antisemitism and anti-Jewish violence.
Karen Auerbach, Tuesday and Thursday, 11am-12.15 pm

 

RELI 205: Sacrifice in the Ancient World.
This course examines the religious phenomenon of sacrifice with a focus on examples from the ancient Mediterranean world (including Greece, ancient Israel, and the Near East). Honors version available.
Joseph Lam, Tuesday and Thursday, 9.30-10.45 am

 

RELI 426: The Sacrifice of Abraham.
This course examines philosophical interpretations of the attempted sacrifice by Abraham of his beloved son, offering a comparative approach. The incident in Genesis is remarkably succinct for its controversial subject matter. We will compare this event with representations in Greek drama, the New Testament, and the Qur’an. Honors version available.
Andrea Cooper, Tuesday and Thursday, 12.30-1.45 pm

 

FOLK/JWST 481: Jewish Belongings: Material Culture of the Jewish Experience.
What makes an object “Jewish”? This seminar examines how we think about, animate, repurpose, and display “Jewish” objects in the public realm, cultural institutions, religious spaces, and the home. We consider how makers and users negotiate objects’ various meanings within the domains of prayer, performance, entertainment, and exhibition. The class curates a final group exhibition of Jewish material culture based on original fieldwork.
Gabrielle Berlinger, Tuesday, 2.00-5.00 pm

 

HIST/JWST 485: From Fiddler on the Roof to the Holocaust: East European and Soviet Jewish History.
Eastern Europe was one of the largest centers of Jewish civilization from premodern times to the Second World War, giving rise to important religious, cultural, and political developments in Jewish modernity. This course examines main developments of Jewish society from the late 18th century until the aftermath of the Holocaust.
Karen Auerbach, Tuesday and Thursday, 3.30-4.45 pm

 

RELI 603: The Bible and Its Translation.
This course explores the translation of the Hebrew Bible in the West, with a view toward identifying religious and ideological trends.
David Lambert, Tuesday, 4.00-6.50 pm

 

RELI 697: Capstone Course: Themes and Methodologies in Jewish Studies
Utopia, Diaspora and Other Jewish Futures in Eastern Europe
Concentrating on a different theme each year, this departmental seminar introduces the different areas and approaches in religious studies. Required of majors in religious studies with a concentration in Jewish studies and graduate students pursuing the certificate in Jewish studies.

This course explores visions of Eastern Europe as a potential or realized home for the Jewish people. Rather than repeat the story of Jewish emigration from Eastern Europe, we will investigate scenarios of Jewish presence and return. Course materials drawing from art, literature, and film tour us through Jewish futures imagined in the past and present by anarchists, Marxists, dissidents, and artists. We will reflect on the Jewish concept of tikkun olam (the repairing of the world) by exploring Jewish participation in social transformations of the twentieth century. We will then turn to the Yiddish cultural revival today and contemporary Jewish culture that invokes traditions of twentieth-century Jewish thought. Films with English subtitles; readings and discussions in English.
Eliza Rose, Tuesday and Thursday, 12.30-1.45 pm

 

Language Courses

 

HEBR/JWST 101: Elementary Modern Hebrew I.
Introduces the essential elements of modern Hebrew structure and vocabulary and aspects of modern Israeli culture. Aural comprehension, reading, speaking, and writing are stressed.
Hanna Sprintzik, Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9.05-9.55 am

 

HEBR/JWST 203: Intermediate Modern Hebrew I.
Prerequisite, HEBR 102. Second-year level instruction in the essential elements of modern Hebrew structure and vocabulary and aspects of modern Israeli culture. Aural comprehension, reading, speaking, and writing are stressed. An introduction to representative literary works is included.
Hanna Sprintzik, Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 10.10-11 am

 

RELI/JWST 211: Classical Hebrew I: A Linguistic Introduction to the Hebrew Bible.
An introduction to the culture and history of ancient Israel through an exploration of the language of the Hebrew Bible. Students will learn the essentials for basic engagement with biblical Hebrew, then consider what this linguistic evidence reveals about the historical and cultural background of the Hebrew Bible.
Joseph Lam, Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 10.10-11 am

 


Spring 2021 JWST Course List

 

JWST 390: Topics in Jewish Studies: Confronting Antisemitism This course takes a broad look at antisemitism in history, our contemporary world, and at UNC. Class sessions will feature guest speakers and discussions on different aspects of this persistent form of hatred. The following questions are key to this course: How has antisemitism evolved over time? How has it remained the same? What are the intersections between antisemitism and other forms of racism? What tools can be used to fight antisemitism?
Max Lazar, TBD

 

ASIA/JWST 60: Israeli Culture and Society: Collective Memories and Fragmented Identities. First-year Seminar. The course explores selected themes and case studies pertinent to culture and society in modern Israel, with emphasis on debates about “Israeliness” in various cultural and social arenas.
Yaron Shemer, Tuesday and Thursday, 11am -12:15 pm

 

GERM 56: Germans, Jews, Antisemitism. First-year Seminar. This course seeks to explore the historically difficult position of minorities in the modern world, using the situation of Jews in Germany from the 18th century to the Holocaust as a case study. Students in this seminar will learn to analyze a variety of texts (both literary and philosophical), musical works, and films in relation to the history of Jews in German-speaking countries, and will be able to apply their knowledge to their analysis of present-day manifestations of anti-semitism and xenophobia in Germany. The course has no requisites and presumes no prior knowledge of the subject matter.
Adi Nester, Monday and Wednesday, 3:35-4:50 pm.

 

RELI 109: History and Culture of Ancient Israel. An examination extending from Hebrew origins to the Babylonian exile and including political history as well as social and religious institutions. This course provides an introduction to the history and culture of ancient Israel from its origins in the Late Bronze Age (approx. 1550–1200 BCE) through the Persian period (539–332 BCE). By synthesizing material from the Bible, other ancient texts, and archaeology, we will come to appreciate the historical forces that shaped ancient Israel and arrive at a framework for a more intelligent and critical reading of the biblical text. The course will also explore themes that are especially relevant to an understanding of ancient Israelite society, including the role of women, social and political structures, and the practices of ancient Israelite religion. Honors version available.
Joseph Lam, Monday and Wednesday, 10:10-11 am.

 

JWST/RELI/CLAR 110: The Archaeology of Palestine in the New Testament Period. This course surveys the archaeology of Palestine (modern Israel and Jordan) from the Persian period (ca. 586 BCE) to the Muslim conquest (640 CE). The slide-illustrated lectures introduce students to the relevant historical background, the major archaeological sites, and the material culture (pottery, coins, etc). The topics we cover include Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls, Herod’s fortress at Masada, ancient Jerusalem, and the development of ancient synagogues and churches. Special attention is devoted to the time of King Herod the Great and the world of Jesus.
Jodi Magness, Tuesday and Thursday, 8-9:15 am

 

JWST/HIST 153: From the Bible to Broadway: Jewish History to Modern Times.  This class surveys the history of the Jews from ancient to modern times. It focuses on the development of Jewish religion, culture identity, and politics in Jewish communities in the Western, Atlantic and Middle Eastern Worlds. It also explores the development of antisemitism and anti-Jewish violence.
Max Lazar, Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 2:30-3:20 pm

 

JWST/RELI 201: Ancient Biblical Interpretation. This course looks at the origins of biblical interpretation, how the Hebrew Bible was interpreted around the turn of the Common Era, the key formative period for early Christianity and rabbinic Judaism. We consider the nature of interpretation as an endeavor, as well as how the Bible came to be viewed as Scripture. Honors version available.
David Lambert, Tuesday and Thursday, 2-3:15 pm

 

JWST/GSLL 225-001: Popular and Pious: Early Modern Jewish Literature. This seminar covers popular and pious literature written by and for Jews in the 15th to 18th century in German-speaking countries. Originally written in Old Yiddish, this literature preserved the popular European genres and nonfiction accounts of Jewish community and family life. This literature preserves genres popular in medieval Europe including chivalric romances, fables, and merry tales, together with early examples of Jewish journalism and autobiography. The course will exam a wide variety of texts in translation to illuminate Jewish life in the context of surrounding Christian cultures. ​
Ruth von Bernuth, Tuesday and Thursday, 3:30-4:45 pm

 

ASIA/JWST/PWAD 235: Israeli Cinema: Gender, Nation, and Ethnicity. This course is designed for students of Middle Eastern Studies, Jewish and Hebrew Studies, Communications, Women’s Studies, Global Cinema, and for all students interested in learning about Israeli culture and society as represented in cinema. The class will explore the modes of expression by which contemporary Israeli films often depict a multifaceted and conflicted nascent society.
Yaron Shemer, Tuesday and Thursday, 2-3:15 pm

 

RELI 270: Religion in Western Europe. In this course, we will explore various topics related to the past and present status of religion in general, and of certain religions in particular, within three Western European countries: the United Kingdom, France, an Germany. After investigating key historical moments in the history of religion in these countries, we will explore the present situation. Some parts of the course will be devoted to one country, while others will compare a certain topic in all three. By the end of this course, students will have a good grasp of religion’s place in, and impact on, these three European countries, in the past and the present.
Evyatar Marienberg, Tuesday and Thursday, 11am-12:15 pm

 

HIST/EURO 347: Fascist Challenge in Europe, 1918-1945. The course focus on theories on fascism, national cultures of fascism (e.g. Nazi Germany, Fascist Italy, Hungary) as well as selected topics which are essential to understand the attraction and functioning of fascist movements and regimes since 1918 in Europe (e.g. racism, war, culture, charismatic leadership).
Kenneth Negy, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 12:20-1:10pm

 

FOLK/JWST 380: Traditions in Transition: Jewish Folklore and Ethnography. This seminar examines Jewish stories, humor, ritual, custom, belief, architecture, dress, and food as forms of creative expression that have complex relationships to Jewish experience, representation, identity, memory, and tradition. What makes these forms of folklore Jewish, how do source communities interpret them, and how do ethnographers document them?
Gabrielle Berlinger, Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 am

 

HIST 398: Undergraduate Seminar in History. Nazi Germany: A View from the Sources.
Permission of the department. The course is in general limited to 15 students. The subject matter will vary with the instructor. Each course will concern itself with a study in depth of some historical problem. Students will write a substantial research paper.
Konrad Jarausch, Monday, 2:30-5 pm

 

JWST 465: Literature of Atrocity: The Gulag and the Holocaust in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Historical contexts and connections through artistic representation of the Holocaust and Soviet terror in Eastern Europe and the USSR.
David Pike, Tuesday and Thursday, 3:30-4:45 pm.

 

RELI/JWST/CLAR 512: Ancient Synagogues. This is a course on ancient synagogues in Palestine and the Diaspora from the Second Temple period to the seventh century CE. Prerequisites: For undergraduates: RELI/JWST 103 or RELI/JWST 106 or RELI/JWST/CLAR 110; undergraduates must be juniors or seniors majoring or minoring in Religious Studies, Jewish Studies, or Classical Archaeology; or graduate standing.
Jodi Magness, Tuesday, 2-4:50 pm

 

Graduate Courses

 

GERM 740S: East/West/Zion:  German Jewish Modernism. A graduate course about Jewish literary writing in the first half of the 20th century. Topics include space and place, tradition and modernity, identity and belonging, language, nationality, religious practice, and politics. Special focus on the role of Eastern Europe in the literary imagination of German-Jewish writers, and the use of modernist form and style. Class discussions in English; readings mostly in German, with some additional texts in Polish, Russian, Yiddish, and Hebrew. Most texts available in English. Class offered by Duke-UNC.
Kata Gellen (Duke), TBD

 

RELI 801: Seminar in Biblical Studies: History of the Self. In this graduate seminar, we will examine a range of literature related to the history of the self, from more theoretical works to specific texts in the history of Judaism and Christianity that shed light on changing conceptions of the individual, agency, emotion, and cognition. The goal will be to move beyond common dichotomies between flesh and spirit, body and mind, to arrive at more embodied, situated, and interactive modes of describing the functioning of the person as represented in ancient literature. The focus will be on biblical and ancient Jewish texts, but students from a variety of different fields are welcome to join, bring their expertise to bear on the topic, and focus on research in their respective areas.
David Lambert, Thursday, 4-6:50 pm

 

Language Courses

 

JWST/RELI 212 Classical Hebrew II: A Linguistic Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. Prerequisite, RELI 211. This course explores the linguistic background of the Hebrew Bible, giving special attention to the literary aspect of biblical interpretation. Specific topics include the forms of the Hebrew verb, prose and poetic genres in the Hebrew Bible, wordplay and repetition, narration and dialogue. Building on the foundation of RELI /JWST211, this course further explores the linguistic background of the Hebrew Bible, with particular focus on the literary aspect of biblical interpretation. We wil consider what it means for the Bible to be a “literary” text, and explore the implications of this claim for our understanding of the Bible in view of its original historical-cultural settings. At the same time, students will deepen their knowledge of Classical Hebrew grammar through an overview of the verbal system, with emphasis on verbal forms, constructions, and sequences that have direct bearing on literary interpretation. The course will include a term paper that provides students the opportunity to present a synthetic interpretation (historical, cultural, literary, and linguistic) of a passage from the Hebrew Bible.
Joseph Lam, Tuesday and Thursday, 11 am-12:15 pm

 

JWST/HEBR 102 Elementary Modern Hebrew II. Prerequisite, HEBR 101. Continued instruction in the essential elements of modern Hebrew structure and vocabulary and aspects of modern Israeli culture. Aural comprehension, reading, speaking, and writing are stressed.
Hanna Sprintzik, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 9:05-9:50 am

 

JWST/ HEBR 204 Intermediate Modern Hebrew II. Prerequisite, HEBR 203. Continued instruction in the essential elements of modern Hebrew structure and vocabulary and aspects of modern Israeli culture. Aural comprehension, reading, speaking, and writing are stressed. An introduction to representative literary works is included.
Hanna Sprintzik, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 10:10-11 am

 

JWST/HEBR 306 Advanced Composition and Conversation: Zionism and the Hebrew Language Advanced Modern Hebrew II. Prerequisite, HEBR 204 305. Third year of instruction in modern Hebrew with an emphasis on Israeli culture, literature, and media.
Hanna Sprintzik, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 12:20-1:10 pm

 


Fall 2020 JWST Course List

 

RELI 063: First Year Seminar: Dead Sea Scrolls | Jodi Magness

JWST 106/ RELI 106: Introduction to Early Judaism |  HS/BN/WB |Jodi Magness

RELI 108: Classic Jewish Texts: From Bible and Dead Sea Scrolls to Kabbalah and Hassidism |  HS/WB | Evyatar Marienberg

JWST/ RELI 343: Religion in Modern Israel | Yaakov Ariel

JWST 480: Jewish Belongings: Material Culture of the Jewish Experience |  EE/US/VP | Gabrielle Berlinger

RELI 542H: Religion and Counter Culture | Yaakov Ariel

JWST 697: Capstone Course: Themes and Methodologies in Jewish Studies. CI | Andrea Cooper

Language Courses

HEBR 101: Elementary Modern Hebrew I. FL | Ana Sprintzik

HEBR 102: Elementary Modern Hebrew IIFL | Ana Sprintzik

JWST 211/ RELI 211: Classical Hebrew I: A Linguistic Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. BN/ WB | Joseph Lam


 

Maymester 2020

Jwst/ASIA/PWAD 235 Israeli Cinema VP/BN/GL | Yaron Shemer

 


Jewish Studies Courses for Spring 2020

 

JWST 390: Topics in Jewish Studies: Confronting Antisemitism
This course takes a broad look at antisemitism in history, our contemporary world, and at UNC. Class sessions will feature guest speakers and discussions on different aspects of this persistent form of hatred. The following questions are key to this course: How has antisemitism evolved over time? How has it remained the same? What are the intersections between antisemitism and other forms of racism? What tools can be used to fight antisemitism?

 

RELI 078: Reading the Bible: Now and Then

RELI 108: Classic Jewish Texts: From Bible and Dead Sea Scrolls to Kabbalah and Hassidism

RELI 109: History and Culture of Ancient Israel

JWST/RELI/CLAR 110: The Archaeology of Palestine in the New Testament Period

JWST/HIST 153: Jewish History Ancient to Modern Times

JWST/HIST/PWAD 262: History of the Holocaust: The Destruction of the European Jews

JWST/ RELI 343: Religion, Politics and Culture in Israel

JWST/ASIA 357/ PWAD 362: The Arab-Jews: Culture, Community, and Coexistence

ASIA 358: Religion and Tradition in Israeli Cinema, TV and Literature 

JWST/ FOLK 380: Traditions in Transition: Jewish Folklore and Ethnography

RELI 426H: The Sacrifice of Abraham

JWST/GSLL/PWAD 465: Literature of Atrocity: The Gulag and the Holocaust in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe

JWST/ RUSS 480H: Russian-Soviet Jewish Culture: Lofty Dreams and Stark Realities

JWST/ HIST 485: Modern East European Jewish History

RELI 501: History of the Bible in Modern Study

Language Courses

HEBR 102: Elementary Modern Hebrew II

JWST/ RELI 212: Classical Hebrew II: A Linguistic Introduction to the Hebrew Bible

HEBR 204: Intermediate Modern Hebrew II

HEBR 305: Advanced Modern Hebrew I


Jewish Studies Courses for Fall 2019

RELI 123/JWST 100: Introduction to Jewish Studies

RELI/JWST 103: Intro to Hebrew Bible

RELI/JWST 106: Introduction to Early Judaism

RELI/JWST 211: Classical Hebrew I: A Linguistic Introduction to the Hebrew Bible

RELI/JWST 420H: Post-Holocaust Ethics and Theology

RELI/JWST 712: Jewish Hist/Lit

JWST 697: Capstone Course: Themes and Methodologies in Jewish Studies: Sounding “Jewish”: Music, Race, Memory

HIST332: Jewish Identity and Community

Language Courses:

HEBR 101: Elementary Modern Hebrew

HEBR203: Intermediate Modern Hebrew


Jewish Studies Courses for Spring 2019

 

RELI/CLAR/JWST 110: New Testament Archaeology

JWST/GSLL/PWAD 465: Atrocity

JWST/HIST 153: Jewish Hist Ancient to Modern

JWST/HIST/PWAD 262: History of the Holocaust

JWST/HIST 311/311H: Ghettos and Shtetls?

JWST/HIST 330: Jesus and Jews

JWST/ASIA /PWAD 235: Israeli Cinema: Nation, Gender and Ethnicity

JWST100/RELI 123: Intro to Jewish studies

JWST/HIST 330/330H: Jesus and the Jews

JWST/GSLL/PWAD 465: Lit of Atrocity

RELI/JWST 503/503H: Exploring the Dead Sea Scrolls

JWST/RELI 602: What is Scripture? 

RELI 426H: The Sacrifice of Abraham

HIST/ASIA 276: Modern Middle East

Language Courses

HEBR 102: Elementary Modern Hebrew II

HEBR 204: Intermediate Modern Hebrew II

HEBR 306: Adv modern Hebrew II


Jewish Studies Courses for Fall 2018

 

Undergraduate Courses:

FOLK 481: The Changing Lives of Jewish Objects

RELI 063: Archaeology of Qumran

JWST/RELI 103: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Literature

JWST/RELI 106: Introduction to Early Judaism

JWST/ASIA/PWAD 235: Israeli Cinema: Gender, Nation, Ethnicity

JWST/RELI 420H: Post-Holocaust Ethics and Theology

JWST/RELI 444: Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Judaism

JWST 697: Capstone Course: Yiddish Literature and the Bible

MUSC 286: Music as Culture: Music, Sound, and Religion in the Middle East and North Africa

Language Courses:

HEBR 101: Elementary Modern Hebrew I

HEBR 203: Intermediate Modern Hebrew I

HEBR 305: Advanced Modern Hebrew I


COURSES IN JEWISH STUDIES Spring 2018

JWST 100/RELI 123: Intro to Jewish Studies,  Andrea Cooper

JWST/CLAR/RELI 110: New Testament Archaeology, Jodi Magness

JWST/HIST 262: History of the Holocaust, Karen  Auerbach

JWST 357/ASIA 357/PWAD 362: The Arab-Jews: Culture, Community, and Co-existence

JWST/HEBR 436: Zionism and Language, Yaron Shemer

JWST/SLAV/PWAD 465: Literature of Atrocity, David Pike

JWST/FOLK 505: Jewish Folklore and Ethnography,  Gabrielle Berlinger

JWST/HIST 330H: Jesus and the Jews, Flora Cassen

HIST 85H: Concentration Camp Survivors, Donald Reid

HIST 276: Modern Middle East,  Sarah Shields

HIST 308: The Renaissance and the Jews,  Flora Cassen

HIST 485: Modern East European Jewish History,  Karen Auerbach

RELI 106: Early Judaism,  Online through Friday Center

RELI 242: New Religious Movements,  Yaakov Ariel.

RELI 542H: Religion and Counter Culture,  Yaakov Ariel.

Language Courses:

HEBR 102: Elementary Modern Hebrew II, Hanna Sprintzik

HEBR 102: Elementary Modern Hebrew II, Hanna Sprintzik

HEBR 204: Intermediate Modern Hebrew II,  Hanna Sprintzik

Graduate Courses:

RELI 812: Diaspora Judaism | Jodi Magness.